["The Nor'-West Ports", The West Australian, Friday 10 June 1910, page 5]

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Though the larger boats round Dirk Hartog Island to enter or leave Shark's Bay, there is a most picturesque exit through the South Passage, a narrow channel of water separating the island from a peninsula of the mainland. Inside the water is so calm and banks on either side so near that one might imagine the boat to be making its way up a wide but sluggish river to the interior. But the South Passage is something to be attempted only in daylight. Though the water seems wide enough the channel is narrow and tortuous. Crossing he inner bar the course is steered according to the appearance of the water; the skipper keeping a sharp lookout for light patches of water, which indicate sand-spits and darker splashes which reveal heavy banks of seaweed. Turning now to starboard and now to port the boat creeps through the maze of submerged dangers, the sea-bed being with its adornments of weed and shell and sharks and fishes, easily discernible on either side of the ship. Then comes a cautious approach to the outer bar. Inside, the water is still calm and the ship motionless. In the foreground is a small rock, and on either side of it a line of foaming breakers. Beyond is a bold headland, known as Steep Point, and the open sea with a big swell running. We get two beacons into line and then dart full speed ahead for an aperture in the line of breakers. In a couple of minutes we pass from the calm of South Passage, over the bar with towering, furious breakers, on either side not five fathoms away, and into the swelling and tossing of the open sea. It seems like shooting the rapids.

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