52[Moore, Doug, Papers, Extracts from his account of his life in the Kimberley, 1904-1914., Battye Library, ACC 3829A (listing MN 1237)]

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The year 1911 was a very bad one for sickness. Malarial fever and Blackwater fever - the white men were all down to it and we lost 20 natives. Quinine we had plenty of, McKenzie's fever mixture and we would mix up Gulf mixture - a recipe given us by Mrs. McAuley of the Stud Station. My mother became very sick - hot and feverish - and it was a great shock to my sister and I to see her slowly failing. Rivers were running, both the Ord and ? and we sent a boy who swam the River and walked 90 miles to the post Office at Turkey Creek with wires to the Doctor asking for instructions and what to give her. By the time the boy returned it was too late, my mother had died. Never in my life have I seen men more helpful and sympathetic. The blacksmith and carpenter made a wonderful coffin out of the side boards of a new waggon, lined it with pure calico and all these men showed out in their true colours and deserve far more credit and thanks for their kindness to people in trouble than I could give and to white women they could never do enough for. They will always have my thanks and both my sister and I will never be able to thank these stockmen enough.

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The country at the time of writing was noted for 'Sacks, blacks and Duracks'. What a difference now - Sacks left, blacks a decaying race and damned few Duracks left.

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