48["Speech in the Sky", The Argus (Melbourne), Wednesday 09 November 1910, page 13]

SPEECH IN THE SKY.

USES OF WIRELESS.

STORY OF ITS ACHIEVEMENTS.

High on the boat deck of the R.M.S. Otranto, fifty feet above the sea, lives Mr. E. T. Fisk. Sharing his cabin are some 50,000 volts of electricity and a Marconi wireless telegraph set. High overhead the messages crackle out form the two wires strung between the mastheads ove hundreds of miles of blue ocean.

...

[salute to wireless and its accomplishments]

...

"'Practical value?' Surely the day is past when that uestion may be asked. From London to the Red Sea we are in touch with iut shore statins, receiving and sending news. We send greetingsbusiness messages, and news, and this cabin is like an ordinary telegraph office, with a 10d. surcharge for the wireless added to the land rates from the head receiving stations. By arrangement with the telegraph companies we receive payment for the messages from the sender. There is an idea abroad that the recipient pays the land charges. That is not so. He or she receives the message exactly under the conditions of an ordinary telegram.

...

[more wireless successes]

...

"We have caught Crippen, the murderer. But long before that the American financier Charles W. Morse was watched upon the Campania across from New York to Liverpool. I was the operator on the Campania at the time. The press wanted news of Morse, and we supplied it. He saw that he could not dodge the ether waves, nd took the next steamer back to face the trouble. That was in 1908.

...

[account of Republic rescue]

...

"Through fog, through the blackest night, through storm an cloud, our Morse flies, 186,000 miles to the second. If we could speak the moon, 1 1/3 seconds would suffice. Eight and a half minutes would call up the sun. We are trammelled by no retarding induction, like the deep-sea cables, and with greater power and more knowledge we may before long send our waves round the world and back again. Often while the Morse buzzes in the receivers from the ships across the sea, it strikes me suddenly what a tremendous thing it is, and how little we really know."