19["The Tien Tsin's track to the Harding River", Perth Gazette and West Australian Times, Friday 05 June 1863, page 2]

Our extracts from Captain Jarman's Journal commence upon his closing in with the land,...

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May 3.--At daylight Enderby Isle in sight; high bluff land and lots of native fires. At noon north-east end of Rosemary Isle in sight, very remarkable from its steep rounded appearance; sounded regularly every two hours and found to agree perfectly both in depth and nature with the Admiralty Sheet No. VII. 1839. At 6 p.m. Rosemary Isle bore S. 1/2 W., north end of Legendre E. by S 1/2 S., Gidley Isle S.E.; the western face of this last named island is the best looking spot I have seen on the West Australian coast, there are apparently many patches of small trees and between them decidedly green stuff of some sort; full moon at 3, o'clock and easterly set of current of tide two knots per hour commenced in the offing at 5 p.m. and ceased at 10 p.m.

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May 5.--At 7 a.m., weighed and stood for Cape Lambert, following the Mystery, in fine smooth water, throughout of much greater depth than indicated upon the Admiralty Sheet. At noon Bezout N.W. 3 miles close in with the land immediately Southward of Cape Lambert, with bold shore to the southward of the eastern reef lying off the same; coasting along under easy sail I saw from the royal yard a deep bay and tempting looking spot for landing, and the Mystery leading we rounded the north headland of the bay afterwards named the "Tien Tsin Harbor" by Mr. Hunt, and anchored in three fathoms at low water spring tide, about midway between Jarman Isle and Samson's Point. At 3.30 p.m. started with Mr. Hunt to sound the bay and get a round of angles for a plan of it, and found the Tien Tsin could with safety carry the same water towards the head, or westerly, half a mile farther with the soundings very regular, the deepest water being towards Jarman Isle; the ebb set out N.N.E. about one knot at three quarter tide; the bottom is sand and shell. It is a fine little harbor and vessels drawing 13 feet can go in with safety and be perfectly sheltered from all winds except between N.E. and E.S.E.; small craft up to 7 feet by going into Butcher Inlet are completely land locked and can lie afloat at low water on that draught. At 2 p.m. Mr. Padbury and others landed, and I did so at 6 p.m. to meet him; there were several natives on the beach, and I do not remember having seen finer looking fellows in any part of the world, they bear much resemblance to the Maories about the north-west coast of New Zealand; I saw none among them under six feet in height, and they have fine muscular development with features not disfigured; they had no weapons, and carried Mr. Samson and myself out of the boat.

May 7.--Shifted the ship to about half a mile from low water mark where she had 16 feet at least depth. Three natives came to the ship, each upon a support awash in the water of some description of cork wood, much in shape and form like the centre piece of a catamaran, about 8 feet long by 9 inches in diameter, with a cross peg about l8 inches from the end which is grasped by the great toes when the affair becomes too lively, they paddle their craft with the palms of their hands which they use like a dog does his fore-paws when swimming. After much persuasion I induced a fine strapping fellow to leave his perch in the water and come on deck, when I led him by the beard to the main hatch, when one of the bullocks happening to bellow and look up, he made a spring from my hand on to the ship's rail and into the water, and they subsequently appeared to have a most wholesome dread of us and the bullocks, for as soon as the latter made their appearance on shore every man disappeared and we never saw any of them again.

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